CategoryChapter Programs

New Jersey’s Colonial Architecture Told in 100 Buildings

Thursday, May 25th, 2016, at 6:00 p.m.
Kroiz Gallery, U of PA Architectural Archives, 220 S. 34th St.

2016-05-25 David Veasey book jacket

New Jersey marked its 350th birthday in 2014. Today, in this most developed and crowded of states, a surprising number of buildings are still standing from our Colonial Era, 1636 to 1783. They range from a Royal Governor’s mansion in Perth Amboy; to Sandy Hook Lighthouse in Monmouth County; to Christ Episcopal Church in Shrewsbury; to the still functioning Black Horse Inn in Mendham; to a law office in Salem City; to Moravian Gristmill in Hope; to the nation’s oldest farm building in Greenwich.

New Jersey’s extensive architectural heritage is often overshadowed by its neighbors-Philadelphia and New York City-but the Garden State has more varied every-day colonial architecture than any other state because it was the most diverse colony settled by Swedes, Dutch, Scotch, French, English Quakers, and others who brought their architectural traditions with them.

David Veasey is a life-long New Jersey resident and has given illustrated talks all over the state. He has also written other books about the state. Veasey lives in Morris Plains, and graduated from Drew University, Madison, and holds a Master’s Degree from New York University. Veasey has worked as a writer his entire career.

Free, space is limited, reservations required by email at info@philachaptersah.org or by phone to Bill Whitaker at (215) 898-8323

Louise duPont Crowninshield: Historic Preservation Pioneer

2016-02-24 Kim Burdick Louise at Saugus cropped

Wednesday, February 24, 6:00 p.m.
Athenaeum of Philadelphia, 219 S 6th St
Free for Philadelphia Chapter SAH & Athenaeum members,
$10 for all others, payable on site.
Registration requested at info@philachaptersah.org

The Louise duPont Crowninshield Award is the highest honor given by the National Trust for excellence in historic preservation.  Yet many of the current generation of preservation professionals knows very little about the woman for whom this award is named.  Sister to Winterthur ‘s Henry Francis du Pont, Mrs. Crowninshield was actively involved in the creation of the historic preservation movement in Delaware, Massachusetts, Virginia, and Washington, D.C.  She worked tirelessly on behalf of the National Council of Historic Sites and Buildings as it struggled to establish what later became the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

Join us for this presentation by Kim Burdick, advisor emeritus to the National Trust for Historic Preservation and site manager at the Hale Byrnes House in Newark, DE.  Kim is an award-winning public historian and educator.  Her work on Delaware history and folklife can be found in the University of Delaware’s Special Collections at Morris Library, the Delaware Historical Society, and at Hagley Museum & Library.

This is the first program in the Philadelphia Chapter SAH’s 2016 commemoration of both the 50th anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act and the Centennial of the National Park Service.

 

 

 

 

Annual Pizza & Pictures Party

pizza & pix

Save the Date: Wednesday, January 20, 2015 at 6:00 p.m.
The Athenaeum of Philadelphia, 219 S. 6th Street
Please join your fellow members for an evening of fun and good food!

Pizza and beverages will be provided.  Please feel free to bring a dessert to share if you wish.  There is no charge for Philadelphia Chapter SAH members PLUS each member is invited to bring one guest.  Additional guests are welcome at $15.00 each. Please RSVP to William V. Kriebel, Phila SAH Treasurer at kriebewv@drexel.edu or 215-735-3697.

If you would like to bring a few digital images to give a short (5 minute/10-15 image) talk on a recent project, current research, or “What I did on my summer vacation,” please contact Bruce Laverty at laverty@PhilaAthenaeum.org or 215-925-2688.  Pre-registration required to show images as time is limited.  Images should be placed on a thumb drive in a PowerPoint file or as individual image files.

Curator’s Tour of Barton Myers: Works of Architecture and Urbanism

The Philadelphia Chapter Society of Architectural Historians invites you to
A Curator’s Tour of
Barton Myers: Works of Architecture and Urbanism
Thursday, Dec. 10 at 6:00 p.m.
Harvey & Irwin Kroiz Gallery, University of Pennsylvania Architectural Archives,
220 South 34th Street
Free and open to all.
Space is limited, reservations required at info@philachaptersah.org

Myers Residence

Myers Residence

This exhibition explores the remarkable architectural legacy of Barton Myers (GAR ‘64), an architect whose work ranges from stunning houses built of “off the shelf” parts to cutting-edge theater designs. Establishing his practice in Toronto, Canada in 1968, Myers first gained prominence for his “urban consolidation” projects – efforts aimed at countering suburbanization; he returned to the United States in 1984 to open a Los Angeles office, where he received wide acclaim for his performing arts centers and house designs. The exhibition presents more than 150 works, including models and design sketches, and is the first broad examination of the architect’s work to be shown on the East Coast.

10/3 East Falls tour has been postponed due to bad weather

Our original rain date of Sunday 10/4 will be wetter than Saturday and even if the rain is light tomorrow, the wind will be wicked, so we’ve decided to postpone the tour. If our guides can find a weekend date early in November we’ll go with that. Otherwise we may put it off until the spring.  We’ll post the new date here as soon as it has been confirmed.

Architectural Surprises of Upper East Falls (Queen Lane Manor) Walking Tour

2015-10-03 East Falls tour Queen Lane Manor Apt Bldg 2

Saturday, October 3, 11:00 a.m., Queen Lane SEPTA station

Free for Phila Chapter SAH members, $10 for their guests, payable on site.

Space is limited, registration is required at info@philachaptersah.org

Within a few blocks the upper or eastern part of East Falls, formerly known as Queen Lane Manor, contains excellent examples of a range of architectural styles: grandiose Beaux Arts, clean and crisp International, Art Deco, Georgian Revival, Gothic revival, Jacobean, and more. The history of the Queen Lane Manor district, The Oak Road, the Queen Lane Reservoir and Filters, and more, will also be discussed. Our guide Steven J. Peitzman, professor of medicine at Drexel University and a long-time architecture enthusiast, developed this tour for the East Falls Historical Society. We will also be joined by Ken Hinde, an authority on Philadelphia architecture and former Director of the Foundation for Architecture’s Tour Program.

The tour will start at the Queen Lane SEPTA station (Chestnut Hill West Line), 5319 Wissahickon Ave. at W. Queen Lane. If coming by train consult SEPTA schedules (www.septa.org). There is ample free parking on weekends at the station if coming by car. The tour will take about 2 hours. Comfortable walking shoes are advised. Bring water or refreshments if you wish, but rest rooms cannot be assured, so plan accordingly. Rain date will be Sunday, October 4. If the tour is moved to Sunday those registered will be emailed no later than 9:00 a.m. on Saturday morning, it will also be posted on the Phila Chapter SAH website www.philachaptersah.org under Chapter Programs.

CURATOR’S TALK AND TOUR

2015-09-10 Feats of Clay cropped

Thursday, Sept. 10 at 6:00 p.m.
The Architectural Archives, University of Pennsylvania
Harvey and Irwin Kroiz Gallery, 220 South 34th Street

John curator’s Frank G. Matero and William Whitaker for a gallery talk and tour of the exhibition, “Feats of Clay: Philadelphia Brick and Terracotta.” This exhibition traces the rise of the brick and terra cotta industry in Philadelphia and its far reaching influences on American architecture and building technology.  The exhibition also seeks to raise the awareness and appreciation of the region’s wealth of historic brick and terra cotta architecture and long craft tradition, as well as their relevance to contemporary sustainable design.

Free and open to Philadelphia Chapter SAH members and their guests.  Registration requested at info@philachaptersah.org.

wrong email address for Oakbourne registration

I listed an incorrect email address for reservations for the SAH event at Oakbourne on June 11.  The correct address is info@philachaptersah.org

Sorry for any inconvenience.

T. Roney Williamson and Oakbourne

2015-06-11 Oakbourne Mansion  SAR_4954cropped
Thursday, June 11, Reception at 5:30 p.m., Talk at 6:30 p.m.
Oakbourne Park, 1014 S. Concord Rd, West Chester, PA

In 1882 James C. Smith of Philadelphia purchased 143 acres of land in Westtown Township, Chester County with an existing granite mansion. By 1884 the Smiths had enlarged and refurbished the mansion to replace their original summer house and named it “Oakbourne.”  The Queen Anne renovations are attributed to West Chester architect T. Roney Williamson (1852-1896).  Mr. Smith died in 1893 and willed the property to the Philadelphia Protestant Episcopal City Mission with the stipulation that it be used as a retreat for sick and convalescent white women, 23 years of age or older.  For more than 70 years the James C. Smith Memorial Home was opened to guests.  As many as 25 to 30 women convalesced there at any given time. By 1971, however, increasing operational costs forced the home to close its doors.  In 1974 Westtown Township purchased the land for use as a township park.

Our speaker, Jane E. Dorchester, is a historic preservationist, lecturer, local and architectural historian, and writer who has been working in the preservation field since 1983.  She has lectured on a wide variety of history–oriented topics, including “How To Research Your Historic Property,” “What Is Serpentine,” “Section 106 Review,” and “Gothic Revival, Second Empire, and Queen Anne Architectural Styles in Chester County.”

Join us for wine and refreshments at 5:30 p.m. to explore the exterior of this amazing house while the sun is out.  We’ll gather inside at 6:30 p.m. to hear about Oakbourne’s architect and his other work in the area.

$10.00 for Phila SAH members,
$15.00 for all others, payable on site.
Registration required by Sunday, June 7, at info@philachaptersah.org

Thanks to the Westtown Township Historical Commission for hosting this program.

There is no public transportation to Oakbourne, but we may be able to arrange a ride or a pick up at the Media or Paoli Regional Rail stations.  Please email info@philasah.org if you need a way to get to the program.

HARRISON’S FOLLY

2015-03-30 Harrison's Folly
co-sponsored with The Oliver Evans Chapter, Society for Industrial Archeology

by Patty McCarthy, Friends of Northeast Philadelphia History

Monday, March 30
5:30 Wine/Beer & Cheese, 6:30 Program
Registration required at oliverevanssia@outlook.com

Cost: $10 for those who register in advance, $15 for non-registered, Payable at the door.

Fairmount Water Works Interpretive Center, 640 Waterworks Dr.
Since the Art Museum and Restaurant are closed, you can park on the circle around the Seahorse Fountain, closer to FWWIC.

“Some persons care little or nothing for the past. Musty records and old things have no charm for them.” Joseph Harrison Jr., The Locomotive Engineer and Philadelphia’s Share In Its Early Improvements, 1872

Joseph Harrison Jr. (1810-1874), engineer, inventor, art collector, writer and one-time major property owner in Northeast Philadelphia, was not a person who cared “little or nothing for the past.”  The quote above is the opening passage of his 1872 history of the early development of the locomotive, a history in which Harrison himself played a significant role [as creator of the Harrison Safety Boiler]. In 2013, a collection of photographs came to light offering previously unknown views of Harrison’s unusual mid-19th-century estate stretching from Holmesburg to Torresdale along the Delaware River.  The photos were taken in 1901 by the Philadelphia Water Department to document its demolition of the estate for construction of the new Torresdale Water Treatment Plant on the site.  The images are part of an album that includes mechanical drawings and other technical materials on the plant’s construction.  In the 1950s, a superintendent at the plant rescued the album from a junk pile and gave it to his son-in-law Henry Kalinowski, also a superintendent at the plant.  The album eventually passed into the possession of Kalinowski’s daughter Vivian Haggerty, who is a neighbor of local historian Pat Worthington Stopper.  Stopper arranged for the album’s donation to the Friends of Northeast Philadelphia History.  As revealed in the photos, “Harrison’s Folly,” as the estate came to be known, was an interesting and unusual property. The same could be said for the man who built it.  Join Patty McCarthy to learn about this fascinating slice of Philly history.(Text adapted from Northeast Times, August 27, 2014)