TagCountry Houses

HENRY W. BROWN, HIS HOUSE, AND THE OAK ROAD: A WALKING TOUR

Ivy Cottage, 3819 The Oak Road, 1914

Sponsored by The East Falls Historical Society

Led by David M. Breiner, PhD, Thomas Jefferson University,
and Steven J. Peitzman, MD, Drexel University

Saturday, September 15, 2018 at 10 a.m. (Rain Date will be Sunday September 16)

Cost $15, EFHS Members $10, payable on site, pre-registration is not required.

Please meet at 10:00 sharp at the southwest corner of The Oak Road and School House Lane. The tour goes on unless the morning brings heavy rain. Parking is permitted along some parts of The Oak Road. For more information contact Steven Peitzman at peitzmansj@gmail.com.

Stretching only from School House Lane to Midvale Avenue, The Oak Road is likely the only street in Philadelphia that both requires a  “The” for its full name, and has always contained an oak tree in its center. Both the street and its dominant structure, the Timmons House, were created by Henry W. Brown in 1907. Brown was a prominent figure in the insurance industry and a lead cricket player at the Germantown Cricket Club. The Oak Road came to be both a residential “colony” for the Brown family and a handsome development of mostly Colonial Revival homes: the handsome brick and stucco Timmons house exemplifies the Colonial Revival movement in American Architecture and culture. Other buildings on the tour will include the Ivy Cottage, a Gothic revival house dating to circa 1860, and the Memorial Church of the Good Shepherd, designed by Philadelphia architect Carl Ziegler and built in 1926. The tour leaders, David Breiner, PhD and Steven Peitzman, MD, will also discuss the historical background of School House Lane and of the nearby part of East Falls which was once known as Queen Lane Manor. We will not visit inside the structures to be discussed, but the tour leaders will share several historic maps and photographs. The tour will meet on Saturday, September 15, at 10 am, at the southwest corner of School House Lane and The Oak Road.

Little Flower Manor Park Master Site Plan

This Mon., Feb. 26, 2018, the Delaware County Planning Department will be hosting a public meeting to discuss the master plan for Little Flower Manor, a 33-acre open space site located on Springfield Road in Darby Borough and Upper Darby Township.

The meeting is at 7:00 p.m. at  the Darby Borough Community Center, 1022 Ridge Avenue, Darby, PA.  No registration is required.


The site is slated to become the largest County-owned park among eastern Delaware County municipalities and features Woodburne, a stately residence designed by Horace Trumbauer in 1906. In the 1930s it was home to the Little Flower Institute, a girls orphanage operated by Sisters of the Divine Redeemer.  In the 1970s it became a nursing home, Little Flower Manor, closing in 2005. Currently the fate of the historic property remains uncertain. Project overseers invite public comment on desired uses of Woodburne and its adjacent open space.

For more information visit http://www.co.delaware.pa.us/planning/currentprojects/LFMPublicMeetingNotice2.html
and
http://www.co.delaware.pa.us/planning/currentprojects/LittleFlowerManorMasterSiteDevelopmentPlan.html

Save the Dates for Collegeville 3/10 or 3/11

We are working on a guided tour of the exhibit “Real Estate: Dwelling in Contemporary Art” on view at the The Philip & Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College in Collegeville, PA, on either Saturday, March 10 or Sunday, March 11 at 12:30 p.m.
https://www.ursinus.edu/live/profiles/3083-real-estate-dwelling-in-contemporary-art/berman/exhibition.php

We are also hoping to set up a tour of the Speaker’s House less than a mile away in Trappe, PA, following the Berman Museum at about 2:00 p.m.  The home of Frederick Muhlenberg, the First and Third Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, is currently being restored to its 1790s appearance.

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CURATOR’S TALK AND TOUR

2015-09-10 Feats of Clay cropped

Thursday, Sept. 10 at 6:00 p.m.
The Architectural Archives, University of Pennsylvania
Harvey and Irwin Kroiz Gallery, 220 South 34th Street

John curator’s Frank G. Matero and William Whitaker for a gallery talk and tour of the exhibition, “Feats of Clay: Philadelphia Brick and Terracotta.” This exhibition traces the rise of the brick and terra cotta industry in Philadelphia and its far reaching influences on American architecture and building technology.  The exhibition also seeks to raise the awareness and appreciation of the region’s wealth of historic brick and terra cotta architecture and long craft tradition, as well as their relevance to contemporary sustainable design.

Free and open to Philadelphia Chapter SAH members and their guests.  Registration requested at info@philachaptersah.org.

T. Roney Williamson and Oakbourne

2015-06-11 Oakbourne Mansion  SAR_4954cropped
Thursday, June 11, Reception at 5:30 p.m., Talk at 6:30 p.m.
Oakbourne Park, 1014 S. Concord Rd, West Chester, PA

In 1882 James C. Smith of Philadelphia purchased 143 acres of land in Westtown Township, Chester County with an existing granite mansion. By 1884 the Smiths had enlarged and refurbished the mansion to replace their original summer house and named it “Oakbourne.”  The Queen Anne renovations are attributed to West Chester architect T. Roney Williamson (1852-1896).  Mr. Smith died in 1893 and willed the property to the Philadelphia Protestant Episcopal City Mission with the stipulation that it be used as a retreat for sick and convalescent white women, 23 years of age or older.  For more than 70 years the James C. Smith Memorial Home was opened to guests.  As many as 25 to 30 women convalesced there at any given time. By 1971, however, increasing operational costs forced the home to close its doors.  In 1974 Westtown Township purchased the land for use as a township park.

Our speaker, Jane E. Dorchester, is a historic preservationist, lecturer, local and architectural historian, and writer who has been working in the preservation field since 1983.  She has lectured on a wide variety of history–oriented topics, including “How To Research Your Historic Property,” “What Is Serpentine,” “Section 106 Review,” and “Gothic Revival, Second Empire, and Queen Anne Architectural Styles in Chester County.”

Join us for wine and refreshments at 5:30 p.m. to explore the exterior of this amazing house while the sun is out.  We’ll gather inside at 6:30 p.m. to hear about Oakbourne’s architect and his other work in the area.

$10.00 for Phila SAH members,
$15.00 for all others, payable on site.
Registration required by Sunday, June 7, at info@philachaptersah.org

Thanks to the Westtown Township Historical Commission for hosting this program.

There is no public transportation to Oakbourne, but we may be able to arrange a ride or a pick up at the Media or Paoli Regional Rail stations.  Please email info@philasah.org if you need a way to get to the program.

Narratives of Manners and Style: The Houses of Cross & Cross

2015-05-15 Cross & Cross

Winterthur Museum & Gardens
Tuesday, May 19 at 6:00 pm
Copeland Lecture Hall
5105 Kennett Pike, Wilmington, DE
Winterthur recommends using Mapquest for directions as Google Maps sometimes gives inaccurate directions.

Members $5. Nonmembers $15
Register by calling 1-800-448-3883.
Book signing to follow.

Join architect Peter Pennoyer and architectural historian Anne Walker, authors of the new book New York Transformed: The Architecture of Cross & Cross, for a look at two of the early 1900s’ most important but largely forgotten architects. Brothers John and Eliot Cross counted the country’s richest and most influential figures among their clients, yet they tended to gravitate toward an unpretentious luxury—a polite and historically embedded expression of their wealth. They designed several magnificent Colonial Revival houses in New York as well as country houses in fashionable areas such as Long Island’s North Shore and East End, Greenwich, Connecticut, and Far Hills, New Jersey. Most notably, they designed J. Watson and Electra Havemeyer Webb’s Brick House in Shelburne, Vermont (now part of the Shelburne Museum), Chestertown House in Southampton for H. F. du Pont, and the childhood home of famed decorator Sister Parish in Far Hills, New Jersey. Pennoyer and Walker will share gorgeous photos of these homes and insight into the people who lived there and will discuss the influences the Cross brothers used while designing each property