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WILLIAM RAU’S PHILADELPHIA

“Old store Race St. Wharf, Phila.” Race Street at Delaware Avenue, ca. 1880-1900. Library of Congress.

The Oliver Evans Society for Industrial Archeology, the Philadelphia Chapter Society of Architectural Historians and the Wagner Free Institute of Science invite you to

A Glass Lantern Slide presentation by Martha Capwell Fox, Historian and Archives Coordinator for the National Canal Museum, a program of the Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor

Wednesday, December 5 at 6:00 p.m.
The Wagner Free Institute of Science, 1700 W Montgomery Avenue, Philadelphia

Reception to follow.

$15 per person for members of The Oliver Evans Society for Industrial Archeology, the Philadelphia Chapter Society of Architectural Historians and the Wagner Free Institute of Science and their guests, $20 for all others.

ALL TICKETS MUST BE PURCHASED IN ADVANCE, NO ADMISSIONS AT THE DOOR.  Select ticket from drop down menu below, then click Add to Cart button.


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Using the Wagner’s vintage glass lantern slide projector Martha will present a program featuring 19th-C views of Philadelphia by famed photographer William H. Rau, (January 19, 1855 – November 19, 1920).  Born in Philadelphia, at the age of 13, he started doing photographic work for his future father-in-law, William Bell, a medical and survey photographer for the federal government. In 1874, with Bell’s recommendation, Rau joined an expedition to Chatham Island in the South Pacific to photograph the Transit of Venus. After returning, Rau worked for the Centennial Photographic Company, the official photographers of Philadelphia’s 1876 Centennial Exposition. After the exposition, he joined his father-in-law’s stereo card studio, which he purchased in 1878. He operated this studio in partnership with his brother, George, until 1880. From that point into the 20th-C he traveled the world making photographs on commission for numerous groups.  He spent a significant portion of the 1890s doing photographic work for both the Lehigh Valley Railroad and the Pennsylvania Railroad, and published collections of his railroad photos in 1892 and 1900.  He was the official photographer for the St. Louis World’s Fair in 1904 and the Lewis and Clark Centennial Exposition in Portland the following year.  His work is now included in the collections of several prominent museums, libraries and archives around the world.

The National Canal Museum’s collection of Rau glass lantern slides was a gift from Professor Charles Best, who was chair of the engineering department at Lafayette College.  There are over 1200 slides in his collection, but we will see about 80 of the best of Philadelphia.

Martha Capwell Fox has been with the National Canal Museum for six years, but has a three decades-long relationship with the Museum through former Director Lance Metz. She graduated from American University with a dual degree in International Relations and History.  She spent most of her career in publishing; working at National Geographic and was a senior editor at Rodale Press.  She has published seven books, four Arcadia books on local  Lehigh Valley history, and YA histories of swimming, auto racing and Vatican City.  Her latest book, “Geography, Geology, and Genius:  The Industrial History of the Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor” is in production and should be out by the end of the year.

The talk will take place in the historic Lecture Hall of the Wagner Free Institute of Science and is followed by a reception in the Museum.

About the Wagner: Founded in 1855, the Wagner Free Institute of Science is dedicated to providing free public education in science. Its programs serve all ages and include evening science courses—the oldest free adult education program in the country—lectures, field trips and children’s lessons. The Wagner is also committed to preserving and interpreting its National Historic Landmark building, designed by John McArthur, which opened in 1865. The building houses a Victorian-era lecture hall, a library, and three-story exhibition hall displaying more than 100,000 natural history specimens. The site is virtually unchanged since the 1890s. The Wagner today is both an educational institution that teaches contemporary science, and a historic site that presents a time capsule of Victorian science. It is open to visitors Tuesdays – Fridays, 9 AM to 4 PM, year-round, and offers an array of evening and weekend programs throughout the year. It is located at 1700 W. Montgomery Avenue, a few blocks from Temple University’s main campus and the Temple-Cecil B. Moore Broad Street Line station.

Skyline Spectacular: Outdoor Advertising Structures and American Architecture

Image Credit: Jack E. Boucher, photographer. EAST FACADE AS SEEN FROM EIGTH AND MARKET STREETS – Philadelphia Saving Fund Society, Twelfth & Market Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA. 1985. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540

Presented by Craig Lee, art history Ph.D. candidate at the University of Delaware and Philadelphia Chapter SAH 2018 George B. Tatum Annual International Conference Fellow

Tuesday, October 2 at 6:00 p.m.

The Athenaeum of Philadelphia, 219 S 6th St,

For Philadelphia Chapter SAH Members and their guests only, please register at info@philachaptersah.org

Initially dismissed as a visual blight, outdoor advertising structures rose with the twentieth-century’s new skyscrapers in the United States and soon came to overlook the urban realm, provoking intense public and professional debate about the changing nature of the American cityscape. Their transformational effect led to a range of responses across the country from new restrictive building codes and civic lawsuits to their embrace in architectural designs and urban depictions. Please join Craig to explore the history of rooftop billboards, illuminated spectaculars, and other forms of commercial signage on top of buildings in relation to the aesthetic politics of the American skyline

HENRY W. BROWN, HIS HOUSE, AND THE OAK ROAD: A WALKING TOUR

Ivy Cottage, 3819 The Oak Road, 1914

Sponsored by The East Falls Historical Society

Led by David M. Breiner, PhD, Thomas Jefferson University,
and Steven J. Peitzman, MD, Drexel University

Saturday, September 15, 2018 at 10 a.m. (Rain Date will be Sunday September 16)

Cost $15, EFHS Members $10, payable on site, pre-registration is not required.

Please meet at 10:00 sharp at the southwest corner of The Oak Road and School House Lane. The tour goes on unless the morning brings heavy rain. Parking is permitted along some parts of The Oak Road. For more information contact Steven Peitzman at peitzmansj@gmail.com.

Stretching only from School House Lane to Midvale Avenue, The Oak Road is likely the only street in Philadelphia that both requires a  “The” for its full name, and has always contained an oak tree in its center. Both the street and its dominant structure, the Timmons House, were created by Henry W. Brown in 1907. Brown was a prominent figure in the insurance industry and a lead cricket player at the Germantown Cricket Club. The Oak Road came to be both a residential “colony” for the Brown family and a handsome development of mostly Colonial Revival homes: the handsome brick and stucco Timmons house exemplifies the Colonial Revival movement in American Architecture and culture. Other buildings on the tour will include the Ivy Cottage, a Gothic revival house dating to circa 1860, and the Memorial Church of the Good Shepherd, designed by Philadelphia architect Carl Ziegler and built in 1926. The tour leaders, David Breiner, PhD and Steven Peitzman, MD, will also discuss the historical background of School House Lane and of the nearby part of East Falls which was once known as Queen Lane Manor. We will not visit inside the structures to be discussed, but the tour leaders will share several historic maps and photographs. The tour will meet on Saturday, September 15, at 10 am, at the southwest corner of School House Lane and The Oak Road.

Annual Members Meeting & Program 05/16/2018

Please join the Philadelphia Chapter SAH for our annual meeting of the Members and program.

The “Lady Architect”: (Re)Discovering the Career
and Clientele of Minerva Parker Nichols (1862-1949)

by Margaret (Molly) Lester, Research Associate for PennPraxis and creator
of the Preserving Minerva website, www.minervaparkernichols.com

Wednesday, May 16 at 6:00 p.m.
at The Athenaeum of Philadelphia,
219 S. 6th Street

The program will begin following the annual meeting of the Members.

Free for Phila Chapter SAH members.
$15.00 for non-members, payable on site.
Registration requested at info@philachaptersah.org

Although her formal independent practice lasted just eight years and was concentrated in the Philadelphia area, Minerva Parker Nichols (1862-1949) built a career and clientele of architectural and social significance in the late nineteenth-century’s professionalizing field of architecture. Trained as an apprentice, Nichols designed over 60 commissions nationwide, earning plaudits and extensive press coverage from her peers. Yet, she is rarely recognized today for her contributions to the field of architecture—in particular, on behalf of female clients and women’s clubs in an era of growing economic independence for women. This oversight neglects one of the earliest case studies of a woman successfully contributing dozens of structures to the American built environment—including spaces explicitly for women—and creating a business model as an independent female architect where there was none. This talk is based on research that began 7 years ago for a Master’s thesis, and continues today.

Margaret (Molly) Lester is a Research Associate for PennPraxis, the center for applied research, outreach, and practice at PennDesign.  Her portfolio includes research, documentation, and field survey projects related to historic buildings and landscapes, ranging from eighteenth-century historic sacred places to twentieth-century public golf courses. Previously, she worked as a freelance architectural historian and preservation planner, a national program director for Partners for Sacred Places, and an architectural historian/historic tax credit consultant for Heritage Consulting Group. She holds a Master of Science in Historic Preservation from the University of Pennsylvania and a Bachelor of Architectural History from the University of Virginia.

PAUL CRET AND MODERN CLASSICISM

A conference, celebrating the centennial of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway
presented by the Athenaeum of Philadelphia and the Philadelphia Museum of Art
May 11-12, 2018

Friday, May 11 (at the Athenaeum of Philadelphia)
5:30 PM Registration and Reception
6:30 PM Keynote Address: “What Does the City Beautiful Mean for the 21st Century City?”
Paul Goldberger

Saturday, May 12 (at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Perelman Building)
9:00 AM Registration

9:30 AM First session
“Paul Cret and Philadelphia’s Modern Classicism”
David Brownlee, University of Pennsylvania, “Between Column and I-Beam: The Architectural Theory of Paul Cret”
Marc Vincent, Baldwin Wallace University, “Cass Gilbert and the City Beautiful”
Gail Fenske, Roger Williams University, “Friendly Rivals: Paul Cret and Arthur Brown, Jr. at Home and Abroad”
Jeffrey T. Tilman, University of Cincinnati

12:00PM Lunch Break (on your own)

1:30 PM Second Session
“’An Artistic Gem’: Paul Cret and the Rodin Museum”, Jennifer Thompson, Philadelphia Museum of Art
“’Nioc! Nioc-Nioc!’ (Quack, Quack, Quack): Paul Philippe Cret, Penn’s Poilu-Professor, and World War I”  Alisa Chiles, University of Pennsylvania
“The Architect as Collaborator with the Engineer” Jonathan Farnham, Philadelphia Historical Commission
Robert P. Breading and Barry Eiswerth in conversation, “longtemps après Cret” former partners, H2L2 architects

register online at: www.PhilaAthenaeum.org/symposium.html

Related exhibition:
Professor Cret’s Parkway: One Architect’s Legacy on Philadelphia’s Grandest Thoroughfare
The Athenæum of Philadelphia, April 30-August 31, 2018

The Athenæum of Philadelphia celebrates the Benjamin Franklin Parkway’s 100th anniversary with an exhibition of the works of master architect, Paul Philippe Cret (1876-1945). Arriving here from his native France in 1903, Cret quickly became the acknowledged leader of Philadelphia’s City Beautiful Movement. This exhibition, features more than 30 original designs by Cret (built and unbuilt). These rare documents, many of which have never been exhibited, beautifully illustrate Cret’s lasting influence on Philadelphia.

In conjunction with the Athenæum exhibition, the Rodin Museum will display a 1927 model of its building and gardens alongside photographs and related material exploring Cret’s design for this Parkway institution.

A TRIPLE TOUR IN TRAPPE PLUS THE BERMAN MUSEUM OF ART

Henry Melchior Muhlenberg House, Trappe, PA

Please join us on Saturday, March 17

10:00 a.m, to approximately 1:30 p.m.
$15 for Philadelphia Chapter SAH members and their guests, $20 for non-members, payable on site.
Registration required, please email your name and the names of your guests to info@philachaptersah.org

We will be guided through three historic properties: The Speaker’s House was the home of Frederick Muhlenberg (1750-1801), the First and Third Speaker of the United States House of Representatives from 1781-1791.  The house is currently being restored to its late 18th-C appearance. The Augustus Lutheran Church, a National Historic Landmark built in 1743, was where the Reverend Henry Melchior Muhlenberg (1711-1787), Frederick’ father, preached and became known as the patriarch of the Lutheran Church in the United States. And the Henry Muhlenberg House, a fully restored house museum furnished with many original family artifacts where Henry and his wife Anna Maria raised their large family, several of whom had a significant impact on colonial life in North America as pastors, military officers, and politicians. (www.speakershouse.org — www.augustustrappe.org — www.trappehistoricalsociety.org)

Then we will go to The Philip & Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College for a special tour of the exhibit Real Estate: Dwelling in Contemporary Art with Museum Director, Charlie Stainback.  Named by the Philadelphia Inquirer as one of “Fall’s 13 must-see art exhibits” it features the work of contemporary artists working with or responding to the varying aspects of real estate vernacular—buildings, rooms, structures, monuments, properties and houses.  From the monumental to ubiquitous building, the ordinary, or derelict piece of property to the historic site, architectural details or the room itself, the artists presented in Real Estate consider an array of norms that fall under the much broader term of “architecture”. (www.ursinus.edu/berman).

We will begin at the Augustus Lutheran Church, 717 W. Main Street Collegeville (Trappe), PA, at 10:00 a.m. and tour the three properties through noon, then we’ll gather at the Berman Museum, 601 E Main Street, Collegeville, PA, at 12:30 p.m.

All of these sites are within 1.5 miles along Main Street.

 

Phila Archaeological Forum Historic Burial Places Map and Database

The location of more than 200 historical period burial grounds in Philadelphia can now be viewed on the Philadelphia Archaeological Forum’s Historic Burial Places Map and Database  – and the GIS data set can be downloaded as a shapefile at http://www.phillyarchaeology.net/paf-activities/burial-places-forum/historic-philadelphia-burial-places-map/

As longtime advocates for those who can no longer speak for themselves, PAF is lobbying for clearer municipal laws that compel developers to handle burial remains respectfully. We have therefore created this extensive geographical database (GIS).

It is PAF’s intention that, in addition to being useful to historians, archaeologists, and other researchers, consulting the database of known cemeteries and private family plots will become a starting point in the process of due diligence of both developers and the city of Philadelphia when considering new projects.

The database, originally the personal research of archaeologist Kimberly Morrell, has been assembled from historic maps, newspapers, academic theses and other sources. Research is ongoing, but the database is the most comprehensive such resource to date.

Learn more about how this resource was made and how to use it at http://www.phillyarchaeology.net/paf-activities/burial-places-forum/historic-philadelphia-burial-places-map/

Little Flower Manor Park Master Site Plan

This Mon., Feb. 26, 2018, the Delaware County Planning Department will be hosting a public meeting to discuss the master plan for Little Flower Manor, a 33-acre open space site located on Springfield Road in Darby Borough and Upper Darby Township.

The meeting is at 7:00 p.m. at  the Darby Borough Community Center, 1022 Ridge Avenue, Darby, PA.  No registration is required.


The site is slated to become the largest County-owned park among eastern Delaware County municipalities and features Woodburne, a stately residence designed by Horace Trumbauer in 1906. In the 1930s it was home to the Little Flower Institute, a girls orphanage operated by Sisters of the Divine Redeemer.  In the 1970s it became a nursing home, Little Flower Manor, closing in 2005. Currently the fate of the historic property remains uncertain. Project overseers invite public comment on desired uses of Woodburne and its adjacent open space.

For more information visit http://www.co.delaware.pa.us/planning/currentprojects/LFMPublicMeetingNotice2.html
and
http://www.co.delaware.pa.us/planning/currentprojects/LittleFlowerManorMasterSiteDevelopmentPlan.html

Save the Dates for Collegeville 3/10 or 3/11

We are working on a guided tour of the exhibit “Real Estate: Dwelling in Contemporary Art” on view at the The Philip & Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College in Collegeville, PA, on either Saturday, March 10 or Sunday, March 11 at 12:30 p.m.
https://www.ursinus.edu/live/profiles/3083-real-estate-dwelling-in-contemporary-art/berman/exhibition.php

We are also hoping to set up a tour of the Speaker’s House less than a mile away in Trappe, PA, following the Berman Museum at about 2:00 p.m.  The home of Frederick Muhlenberg, the First and Third Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, is currently being restored to its 1790s appearance.

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Annual Pizza & Pictures Party

Tuesday January 23, 2018 at 6:00 p.m.
The Athenaeum of Philadelphia
219 S. 6th Street

Please join us for an evening of fun
and good food!

SNOW DATE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31

Pizza and beverages will be provided.  Please feel free to bring a dessert to share if you wish.  There is no charge for Philadelphia Chapter SAH members AND each member is invited to bring one guest as a prospective member.  Additional guests are welcome at $15.00 each.

Please RSVP to William V. Kriebel, Phila SAH Treasurer at kriebewv@drexel.edu or call 215-735-3697.

If you would like to bring a few digital images to give a short (5 minute/10-15 image) talk on a recent project, current research, or “What I did on my summer vacation,” please contact Bruce Laverty at laverty@PhilaAthenaeum.org or call 215-925-2688.  Digital images should be placed on a thumb drive as individual image files or in a Power Point file.