Taghistory

Preservation Pioneer: The Life and Legacy of Charles E. Peterson

An exhibition tour with with Bruce Laverty, Curator of Architecture

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Tuesday, October 25, 2016 at 6:00 p.m.
The Athenaeum of Philadelphia, 219 S. 6th Street

The Athenaeum of Philadelphia is pleased to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service and the 50th anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, with this exhibition.

In a career that spanned seven decades, Peterson founded the Historic American Buildings Survey, authored America’s first historic structures report, oversaw the creation of Independence National Historical Park, and created significant endowments that encourage building scholarship, documentation, and publication.

Peterson is credited with coming up with the neighborhood moniker “Society Hill” after discovering that William Penn’s real estate group, the Free Society of Traders, had set up shop in the area in the late 17th century.  He lived in Society Hill from 1954, when he purchased two row houses on Spruce Street for $8,000, until his death at age 97 in 2004.

This event is free, but registration is required as space is limited. Email info@philachaptersah.org

If you are unable to attend the tour the exhibit is on view through December 30, 2016. Free Admission. Gallery hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 am-5:00 pm and occasional Saturdays, check the Athenaeum website www.philaathenaeum.org

Louise duPont Crowninshield: Historic Preservation Pioneer

2016-02-24 Kim Burdick Louise at Saugus cropped

Wednesday, February 24, 6:00 p.m.
Athenaeum of Philadelphia, 219 S 6th St
Free for Philadelphia Chapter SAH & Athenaeum members,
$10 for all others, payable on site.
Registration requested at info@philachaptersah.org

The Louise duPont Crowninshield Award is the highest honor given by the National Trust for excellence in historic preservation.  Yet many of the current generation of preservation professionals knows very little about the woman for whom this award is named.  Sister to Winterthur ‘s Henry Francis du Pont, Mrs. Crowninshield was actively involved in the creation of the historic preservation movement in Delaware, Massachusetts, Virginia, and Washington, D.C.  She worked tirelessly on behalf of the National Council of Historic Sites and Buildings as it struggled to establish what later became the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

Join us for this presentation by Kim Burdick, advisor emeritus to the National Trust for Historic Preservation and site manager at the Hale Byrnes House in Newark, DE.  Kim is an award-winning public historian and educator.  Her work on Delaware history and folklife can be found in the University of Delaware’s Special Collections at Morris Library, the Delaware Historical Society, and at Hagley Museum & Library.

This is the first program in the Philadelphia Chapter SAH’s 2016 commemoration of both the 50th anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act and the Centennial of the National Park Service.

 

 

 

 

T. Roney Williamson and Oakbourne

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Thursday, June 11, Reception at 5:30 p.m., Talk at 6:30 p.m.
Oakbourne Park, 1014 S. Concord Rd, West Chester, PA

In 1882 James C. Smith of Philadelphia purchased 143 acres of land in Westtown Township, Chester County with an existing granite mansion. By 1884 the Smiths had enlarged and refurbished the mansion to replace their original summer house and named it “Oakbourne.”  The Queen Anne renovations are attributed to West Chester architect T. Roney Williamson (1852-1896).  Mr. Smith died in 1893 and willed the property to the Philadelphia Protestant Episcopal City Mission with the stipulation that it be used as a retreat for sick and convalescent white women, 23 years of age or older.  For more than 70 years the James C. Smith Memorial Home was opened to guests.  As many as 25 to 30 women convalesced there at any given time. By 1971, however, increasing operational costs forced the home to close its doors.  In 1974 Westtown Township purchased the land for use as a township park.

Our speaker, Jane E. Dorchester, is a historic preservationist, lecturer, local and architectural historian, and writer who has been working in the preservation field since 1983.  She has lectured on a wide variety of history–oriented topics, including “How To Research Your Historic Property,” “What Is Serpentine,” “Section 106 Review,” and “Gothic Revival, Second Empire, and Queen Anne Architectural Styles in Chester County.”

Join us for wine and refreshments at 5:30 p.m. to explore the exterior of this amazing house while the sun is out.  We’ll gather inside at 6:30 p.m. to hear about Oakbourne’s architect and his other work in the area.

$10.00 for Phila SAH members,
$15.00 for all others, payable on site.
Registration required by Sunday, June 7, at info@philachaptersah.org

Thanks to the Westtown Township Historical Commission for hosting this program.

There is no public transportation to Oakbourne, but we may be able to arrange a ride or a pick up at the Media or Paoli Regional Rail stations.  Please email info@philasah.org if you need a way to get to the program.

150th Birthday of the Wagner Free Institute of Science’s historic building

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PHILADELPHIA 1865: A CITY ON THE EDGE
Delivered by Bruce Laverty, Gladys Brooks Curator of Architecture at the Athenaeum of Philadelphia
Wednesday, May 20th, 2015, 6:00 to 8:30 p.m.
1700 W Montgomery Avenue, Philadelphia

Join us for a lecture, cake competition, and member reception in honor of the 150th Birthday of the Wagner Free Institute of Science’s historic building.

Lecture:
In 1865 Philadelphia was a city on the edge; a city on the edge of grief; a city on the edge of growth; and a city on the edge of genius. That year saw Philadelphia’s joy of Northern victory dashed by the overwhelming shock and grief brought on by the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. Less acute, but even more sobering, was the growing realization in 1865 that Union victory and the abolition of slavery were by no means the end of race problems in the City of Brotherly Love. In 1865 Philadelphia commenced the most rapid physical growth in its history; by century’s end the built portion of the city had more than doubled in size. Finally, 1865 was the year when the genius of local entrepreneurs, both individually and collectively, through the efforts of scientific, benevolent, and educational associations, achieved the critical mass that launched Philadelphia into modernity.

Bruce Laverty, a life-long resident of Philadelphia and graduate of LaSalle College, has been Curator of Architecture at the Athenaeum of Philadelphia since 1983. He prepared that institution’s first catalog of architectural drawings. During his tenure at the Athenaeum, the architectural collection grew from 30,000 to more than 220,000 drawings and he oversaw the creation of nearly 8,000 Visual Materials records documenting them. He has served as curator for more than a dozen exhibitions at the Athenaeum and in 1998 he received the Preservation Achievement Award for his work as curator, editor and co-author of “Monument to Philanthropy: The Design and Building of Girard College, 1832-1848.”

Cake Competition:
For this event we will also be running a cake competition that gives entrants the opportunity to represent the Wagner in cake. Entries are being accepted until May 1st, 2015. All information about the competition, including deadlines and baking parameters, can be found on the Wagner’s website.

Reception:
Following the talk, at 7:30 pm, Wagner members are invited to join us for the Annual Member Reception. Members are welcome to bring one guest to the reception. Non-members and extra guests are asked to pay $10 to attend the event.

For more, visit the event page on the Wagner’s website.
http://www.wagnerfreeinstitute.org/syllabi%202014-15/Philadelphia1865.htm

Registration is encouraged but not required and can be done through Eventbrite https://www.eventbrite.com/e/philadelphia-1865-a-city-on-the-edge-lecture-and-member-reception-tickets-9445428531

ESCAPE: The Heyday of Caribbean Glamour

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A talk and book signing by Hermes Mallea, architect and author
Tuesday, April 7 at 6:00 pm,
Copeland Lecture Hall, Winterthur Museum, Wilmington, DE
Winterthur Members $5. Nonmembers $15.
Call 800.448.3883 for reservations.
For GPS and online mapping services, use: 5105 Kennett Pike, Wilmington, DE 19807. Winterthur recommends using Mapquest for directions as Google Maps sometimes gives inaccurate directions.
www.winterthur,org

Hermes Mallea, architect and author, takes us on a nostalgic celebration of the glamour of warm-weather destinations in the Caribbean and Florida, from the great estates of ambitious patrons, including H. F. du Pont’s retreat in Cuba, to the most exclusive resorts of the mid-20th century. Through iconic photography capturing the cultural mood at the moment when social codes relaxed from the formality of the Gilded Age to the spontaneity of the jet-set era, Mallea takes you inside a world of beach parties and costume balls set in lush tropical landscapes, of rarefied resorts and fairy-tale private estates. Among these idealized settings blossomed the resort lifestyle of international celebrities, from Marjorie Merriweather Post to Babe Paley, Princess Margaret to David Bowie, whose escapades are spectacularly captured in these pages to make the region’s bygone glamour come alive.

Architectural Surprises of Upper East Falls (Queen Lane Manor) Walking Tour

Sponsored by East Falls Historical Society
Saturday, April 18 at 10:00 a.m.
(rescheduled from October, when heavy rain forced postponement).
The fee is $15, or $10 for EFHS members.
The tour will occupy about one hour and 45 minutes. Comfortable walking shoes are advised!

The upper or eastern part of East Falls, formerly known as Queen Lane Manor, within a few-block area contains excellent examples of a range of architectural styles: grandiose Beaux Arts, clean and crisp International, Art Deco, Georgian Revival, Gothic revival, Jacobean, and more.

Creating and leading the tour are Steven J. Peitzman, professor of medicine at Drexel University and a long-time architecture enthusiast; and Ken Hinde, lecturer and tour guide formerly with the Foundation for Architecture and the Philadelphia Society for the Preservation of Landmarks.

The history of the Queen Lane Manor district, The Oak Road, the Queen Lane Reservoir and Filters, and more, will also be discussed. The postponement in fact allowed the tour leaders to conduct further research about the region and its buildings – it’s more interesting than even they had imagined!

The tour will meet at the Revolutionary War monument on the southeast corner of Queen Lane and Fox Street. There is ample street parking in the area, and the meeting location is a short walk from the Queen Lane Station of the Chestnut Hill West Regional Rail Line. The K bus stops at the location.

For more information, contact Steven Peitzman at peitzmansj@gmail.com.

HARRISON’S FOLLY

2015-03-30 Harrison's Folly
co-sponsored with The Oliver Evans Chapter, Society for Industrial Archeology

by Patty McCarthy, Friends of Northeast Philadelphia History

Monday, March 30
5:30 Wine/Beer & Cheese, 6:30 Program
Registration required at oliverevanssia@outlook.com

Cost: $10 for those who register in advance, $15 for non-registered, Payable at the door.

Fairmount Water Works Interpretive Center, 640 Waterworks Dr.
Since the Art Museum and Restaurant are closed, you can park on the circle around the Seahorse Fountain, closer to FWWIC.

“Some persons care little or nothing for the past. Musty records and old things have no charm for them.” Joseph Harrison Jr., The Locomotive Engineer and Philadelphia’s Share In Its Early Improvements, 1872

Joseph Harrison Jr. (1810-1874), engineer, inventor, art collector, writer and one-time major property owner in Northeast Philadelphia, was not a person who cared “little or nothing for the past.”  The quote above is the opening passage of his 1872 history of the early development of the locomotive, a history in which Harrison himself played a significant role [as creator of the Harrison Safety Boiler]. In 2013, a collection of photographs came to light offering previously unknown views of Harrison’s unusual mid-19th-century estate stretching from Holmesburg to Torresdale along the Delaware River.  The photos were taken in 1901 by the Philadelphia Water Department to document its demolition of the estate for construction of the new Torresdale Water Treatment Plant on the site.  The images are part of an album that includes mechanical drawings and other technical materials on the plant’s construction.  In the 1950s, a superintendent at the plant rescued the album from a junk pile and gave it to his son-in-law Henry Kalinowski, also a superintendent at the plant.  The album eventually passed into the possession of Kalinowski’s daughter Vivian Haggerty, who is a neighbor of local historian Pat Worthington Stopper.  Stopper arranged for the album’s donation to the Friends of Northeast Philadelphia History.  As revealed in the photos, “Harrison’s Folly,” as the estate came to be known, was an interesting and unusual property. The same could be said for the man who built it.  Join Patty McCarthy to learn about this fascinating slice of Philly history.(Text adapted from Northeast Times, August 27, 2014)

SAH Annual Meeting

Chicago at the Global Crossroads
The SAH 68th Annual Conference

sah-2015-annual-conferenceCo-Chairs: Ken Tadashi Oshima, 1st Vice President, SAH
Alison Fisher, The Art Institute of Chicago, Department of Architecture and Design

As the SAH marks its 75th anniversary, it is indeed fitting that they gather in the hometown of the Society’s headquarters in Chicago, a city situated at the global crossroads. Strategically located between the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River Valley system, Chicago grew rapidly with westward expansion after the 1803 acquisition of the Louisiana Territory. Becoming a major railway hub of the continental U.S. in the second half of the nineteenth century and international airway hub in the twentieth century, Chicago has always been closely connected to major currents in architecture, landscape architecture, and urban design.

For the 2015 Conference, SAH has sought to curate a balance between paper sessions and a direct experience of the dynamism of Chicago through evening events and tours.

For more visit the SAH website

Phila Chapter SAH Web Site Launched 2015

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This month we launched our new web site! Visit our Chapter Program page to see what we have planned or review past programs.  Keep your eye on our News and Events of Interest page  information of interest on the region’s architecture and design.

Please send info, questions and comments to info@philachaptersah.org

Thanks to John Cooper, our webmaster, for the initial design and upload.