MonthNovember 2015

Curator’s Tour of Barton Myers: Works of Architecture and Urbanism

The Philadelphia Chapter Society of Architectural Historians invites you to
A Curator’s Tour of
Barton Myers: Works of Architecture and Urbanism
Thursday, Dec. 10 at 6:00 p.m.
Harvey & Irwin Kroiz Gallery, University of Pennsylvania Architectural Archives,
220 South 34th Street
Free and open to all.
Space is limited, reservations required at info@philachaptersah.org

Myers Residence

Myers Residence

This exhibition explores the remarkable architectural legacy of Barton Myers (GAR ‘64), an architect whose work ranges from stunning houses built of “off the shelf” parts to cutting-edge theater designs. Establishing his practice in Toronto, Canada in 1968, Myers first gained prominence for his “urban consolidation” projects – efforts aimed at countering suburbanization; he returned to the United States in 1984 to open a Los Angeles office, where he received wide acclaim for his performing arts centers and house designs. The exhibition presents more than 150 works, including models and design sketches, and is the first broad examination of the architect’s work to be shown on the East Coast.

Celebrating an Architectural Masterpiece: The 100th Anniversary of the Harrison Rotunda at the Penn Museum

Penn Musuem lecture_rotunda

Sunday, Nov 8, 2:00 p.m.
Penn Museum, 3260 South Street
Free with Museum admission
http://www.penn.museum/

One of the grandest domes in the country, the Penn Museum’s Harrison rotunda, completed in 1915 and long home to an internationally renowned collection of Chinese art, soars an impressive 90 feet high. David Brownlee, Ph.D., Shapiro-Weitzenhoffer Professor of the History of Art, shares his insights into the historical architectural significance of the rotunda and the auditorium that rests directly below. The completion of the rotunda, he notes, demonstrated the University’s great and modern rationality and its sustained commitment to its museum master plan, designed to accommodate infinite expansion of the museum as its collections grew. It also demonstrated the continued experimentation with architectural vocabulary by its very creative architects. Finally, it was assuredly a bravura display of the nearly magical structural capacity of the Guastavino vaulting system.  Alessandro Pezzati, Museum Senior Archivist, shares stories about the construction and opening of these iconic spaces.